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Archive for August, 2008

Painting of Koi and Blue Heron by Deborah Wilson

Painting of Koi and Blue Heron by Deborah Wilson

I just caught a glimpse of this new piece by Deborah Wilson and fell in love.  You can see the “Anticipation” in the Heron’s eyes as it looks to pluck one of those tasty (?) Koi from the pond.  Deborah is offering this piece as open or limited edition prints so I hope you have the good fortune to enjoy them as much as I do.

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Photographer to Photograph Artwork

Looking for a photographer in the Honaunau area (or Kona side) to photograph 25 pastel pictures for the purposes of making prints and putting images on a website. A studio/well lit area is required, as the artist’s studio is currently enveloped in VOG.  The art consists of LaCarte card- Wallis sanded stock and Canson Mi-Tientes paper.  The sizes range from 6 x 8 through 18 x 24. Several are 10 x 15 and 10 x 16.

We will require the highest (native) resolution of each picture taken in order to produce high quality prints and for use on the website.  Please leave a comment with your contact information for Priscilla.

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Each large limited edition (50) is custom made to order.

Welcome Henani Enos and Olu Saguid

Includes a certificate of authenticity from the artists.

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Waialua Beach Morning giclee print by Lynne Boyer

Waialua Beach Morning giclee print by Lynne Boyer

Giclees, $75 – $550 with subjects done in realism.  Art that meets the customers expectation of “Hawaiian art” (no surprise there) especially when it comes to favorite locations once visited and loved.  Also, low to moderately priced ($50 – $200) traditional Hawaiian art does very well.  The top performing collections on HawaiiArt.com are Hawaiian fish hooks, then prints, photography, lauhala hats, and jewelry.  The worst selling is sculpture, poor sculpture…

It maybe helpful to artists, who are seeking to profit on-line, to understand the mentality of the person on the other side of your modem.   Your customer is literally trusting hundreds or thousands of dollars on a 800 pixel image, a snippet of text, and hopefully a website that has an air of security about it.

First time customers may have little or no reference about what kind of experience your art provides.  All they have to base their decision on is what “they think” your art should be like vs. what it looks like online, and do these factors match up?  Cognitive dissonance between the customers expectations and what your art and it’s online listing conveys can create a lack of trust which is the key make it or break it factor in selling anything.  This is why conveying your work through images, videos,  and text as accurately as possible is so important.

I hope for the day when technology will be able to overcome these limitations.  Perhaps the next version of HawaiiArt.com will be a 3D virtual space where customers can not only see their lauhala hat online but they can place it on there avatars head and see how they look in a virtual mirror.  Unfortunately, artists who create outside the norm and tend towards the abstract will find online sales a struggle especially if their market is primarily made up of first time buyers who dont know the artist “yet”.

Feel free to post questions or comments and I will be happy to share more about the workings of HawaiiArt.com. I would also like to know your thoughts or experiences too.

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